the jazz police

50 Comments

  1. Jeff Foster

    My Dad used to say Thought once killed a man also desperate times call for desperate actions.

  2. Quincy

    When you wake up and realize that jazz isn't more "popular" becasue the sociopathic religious fanatics are afraid to make it about what an individual, a musical genius can accomplish, which is what jazz at its core really is. The bastards are so afraid of it being really about what a musical genius can do on his or her own so they'd rather water it down and bastardize it and make it about what almost any lame mediocre talent person can do (when the bastard religious phonies get their cut of the profits of course). Then they expect those peoples idiot egos will take over from there and they'll act like it's becasue their so great, when really they're a fucking lame ass bitches.

  3. sclogse1

    I'm too big too fit in the door at Small's. You know what I like about what selections here, is that if I played this material at an open mike, (where the rule is you can't play BMI or ASCAP stuff), no one would know it was copyrighted. Nobody. And nobody would know what the fuck the chords were either. Yeah, that guitar sounds sweet. Frets are in order.

  4. 18echosf

    Thanks so much for turning me on to the Bill Evans documentary. It was absolutely fantastic…….informative, touching, gripping, and definitely sad because of the drugs. Drugs……..so fucked up. It’s another of the reasons I left the music business………just could not get band mates away from them and it just changed them in so many bad ways. I think I could have become a good player, but it wasn’t meant to be. At least, my love of good music wasn’t lost. And you, sir, are part of the “Good Music Gang!” Hang in there with your videos and don’t worry about asshole comments from haters. They just don’t matter.

  5. alpep1307

    Jimmy pats and Genos were the shit when we were kids but now they’re for tourists….

    Ftff.
    Keep going

  6. Peter Thomas

    You said recently that "I'll never be as good as I was." I think that is not right because I like your current stuff more than your earlier stuff. To me you now focus more on what the tune wants to say vice putting some hot licks over it. Your chord voicings say more than any single note solo. In my opinion your are still getting better. Hang in there, don't let the buttholes get you down.

  7. S Bingham

    Yay you're still doing videos! Your sense of humor is intact! Brain like a pinball! Lookout, here come the "dissonant police!" (how can anyone not love this???)

  8. Adam Falk

    great movie…. Maltese Falcon. Nice to hear someone else enjoys the classics as well.

  9. rjazzguit

    Pats! Funny went there a lot after wedding gigs and Al’s lessons. Back then nobody ate 1. Love the tele, maybe I’ll bring my old 73 up someday ron worked on it many years ago.

    Sounds beautiful. That was meant as your playing sounds beautuful on that tele.

  10. zenncatt

    Glad you you decided not to quit doing your videos. I was sweating to have to go through withdrawals! Cigarettes and coffee I can cold turkey, but ending your daily videos … tough. Looking forward to the next fix 😉 Have a good one Jimmy.

  11. Vivaldo Ferreira

    Hi Jimmy, beautiful playing and the tele sounds great. Can imagine how it sounds live with your new amp in that room. Last 3 minutes – funny as heck… Trolls just love to try to gag order with their mouse dicks. Do as the elephant does. Nothing. Too big and above the noise to feel mouse penis pokes.

  12. Joe Meyer

    I think you should do that Les Paul at the Iridium thing. . . Find some club (in South Philly) who’ll give you a regular night of the week and just do it! Rope off a section for guitar players over by the restrooms, and save the down front seats for people with real money!

  13. Erol Germann

    Hi there; Mr. Bruno !
    I am glad you aren't following the Neurologist's advice by the line …
    Just quit smoking day by day !

  14. dmz140

    I rarely missed the daily Jimmy video, but I missed one and it was the Evans video. Sorry I missed it. Damn.

    Great music Jimmy! Thanks!

  15. Jay DeLuca

    Hey, Jimmy, I thought you would be in London Saturday for the Royal Wedding! Did you misplace your invitation? Maybe a little Polka Dots and Moonbeams would be appropriate….;-)

  16. dave

    It's a happy Saturday, Jimmy's back. Great playing again today.

  17. Richard Herring

    I missed what ever someone was offended as well…watched the video.????. Loved the Evans documentary…loved it…all those great jazz piano players looked like IBM engineers with hornrimmed glasses lol…hard to believe they were into the hard stuff……
    Suggestion do a video with a bag on your head like the unknown comic from the gong show….

  18. Mac

    You can't give into crybabies like that Jimmy, I swear they're actively looking to be offended. Where would comedians be if they pandered to the few who find everything they say "appalling "? Plus you're self-deprecating and make fun of everyone equally – isn't that equality?

    Anyway, great vid. What was the Bill Evans thing called by the way? Wanted to check it out

  19. Temp289

    I think the tele sounded great. You just wandering around the guitar neck is a wonderful thing to see and hear. Thanks Jimmy. Nice video.

  20. Jawknee Rustle

    Yes!
    I guess I missed whatever was offensive in your Evans video, I watched it and wasn't offended.
    Keep in keepin' on.

  21. Protean Polymath

    Love fishing for minnows, and stuff. The tele sounds good on my end. I got it going through a giant flat screen TV, with the sound going through a couple of amps, a bass, and guitar amp to be exact, and balanced out at the same time It's almost like being there with me playing along. Love it! That "D" chord with the "C" note on the open "A" string third fret is the chord you heard on your car radio, about 15 plus years ago. When you got home you played it on the guitar to acknowledge that you were right about it's structure, and sound.

  22. Protean Polymath

    Elisha Vanslyck Cook Jr. (December 26, 1903 – May 18, 1995)

    He was an American stage, film and television character actor who often specialized in roles as "cowardly villains and neurotics." He is perhaps best remembered for his portrayal of Wilmer in the 1941 version of The Maltese Falcon and the futile efforts made by his character to intimidate Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart) in the film. Cook's acting career spanned more than 60 years, with roles in productions such as The Big Sleep, Shane, The Killing, House on Haunted Hill, and Rosemary's Baby.
    Although this pint-sized actor started out in films often in innocuous college-student roles in mid-30s rah-rahs, playing alongside the likes of a pretty Gloria Stuart or a young, pre-"Oz" Judy Garland, casting directors would soon enough discover his flair for portraying intense neurotics or spineless double-dealers. Thus was he graduated from the innocuous to the noxious. In Warners' They Won't Forget (1937), for example, he plays the role of a student whose social engagement with a young Lana Turner, debuting here in a featured role, seems to have been broken by her whereas, possibly unbeknownst to him, she has quite mysteriously been murdered. Cook becomes so enraged, venting such venom, that the movie audience can only look upon him as a prime suspect in Lana's demise. In Universal's Phantom Lady (1944), he portrays a nightclub-orchestra drummer who, under the intoxicating influence of some substance or other, encounters Ella Raines during an afternoon's band practice. Thoroughly taken with her slinky allure, he enacts a drum-solo piece that is of such crescendo, and played with such innuendo, as to suggest – glaringly – nothing except his own fantasized sexual journey from cymbal foreplay through bass-drum climax.
    He debuted on stage at age 14 and worked in vaudeville, stock companies and Broadway. His only film appearance prior to 1936 was re-playing his stage role, the romantic juvenile lead, in Her Unborn Child (1930). After more work on Broadway, he settled in Hollywood in 1936. From then on, he played type-cast small-time gangsters. His best-known role was that of Wilmer in The Maltese Falcon (1941), the gunsel to whom Bogart spat: "The cheaper the crook, the gaudier the patter". He is also remembered for the sexual innuendo in his scene as the mysterious drummer Cliff March in Phantom Lady (1944). Since he was very slightly built, he has been referred to as the screen's lightest heavy. He appeared in movies through the early 1980s and in many TV shows during the rest of the decade. He suffered a loss of speech due to a stroke in 1990. At age 91, he was the last surviving member of the "Falcon" cast.
    One of the most familiar character actors of the mid-twentieth century, small-statured Elisha Cook Jr. would be a Hollywood immortal if only for his roles in The Maltese Falcon (1941) and Shane (1953). He attended St. Albans College and the Chicago Academy of Dramatic Art, and made his stage debut at age fourteen. He appeared in vaudeville and stock and on Broadway "Lightnin'", "Kingdom of God", "Henry Behave", "Many a Slip", "Ah, Wilderness!" and "Her Unborn Child". He made his film debut in the film version of Her Unborn Child (1930), but did not make the transition to full-time film actor until 1936. His appearance of timidity and wistfulness was counterbalanced by a surprising ferocity, and he quickly became a staple in movies playing both sympathetic and vicious characters. Although he returned occasionally to the stage in such works as Bertolt Brecht's "Arturo Ui", and he worked frequently on television, his career was concentrated on the screen. He continued to give wonderfully memorable performances in such films as Electra Glide in Blue (1973) and Carny (1980) far into advanced age. He lived in his later years in the desert near Bishop, California, far from Hollywood, without an agent, working whenever someone took the trouble to track him down. P. Polymath Cub Reporter for the "Great Late Days of Hollywood Gone "Bye"

  23. Protean Polymath

    "Here is where it's all happening! You don't want to miss this event! Two shows. 8:00pm, and 9:30pm. See below for more information:

    Heads Up! Jimmy Bruno Will be at Smalls, and Mezzro Jazz Clubs on Thursday June 7th ,2018. Smalls & Mezzrow Office Phone (646) 476-4346. Please see below for more information on this jazz extravaganza with Jimmy Bruno.

    Cover: $20.00. This is good for the entire evening, Sunday through Thursday – except for select shows. Please speak with the doorman.
    $20 Per Set 7:30 PM to 12:00 AM on Fridays and Saturdays. Patrons will be invited to stay for an extra set depending on availability.
    $10 Students (This is generally for the 2nd set and at the discretion of the doorman)
    $0 Angels, Wizards and Holy People are always free.
    Smalls does not take reservations – it is a first come/first serve admission policy.

    Addresses:
    Smalls Jazz Club
    183 West 10th Street
    New York City, New York
    10014 USA

    Mezzrow Jazz Club
    163 West 10th Street
    New York City, New York
    10014 USA
    http://www.mezzrow.com

    SmallsLIVE LLC (all business correspondence)
    145 West 10th Street BSMT L-1
    New York City, New York
    10014 USA
    Email:
    smallsjazzclub@gmail.com
    mezzrowclub@gmail.com
    smallslive@gmail.com
    Hours:
    MON – FRI: DOORS AT 7:05 PM – 3 shows.
    1st show from 7:30 to 10:00 pm, 2 sets
    2nd show from 10:30 to 1:00 am, 2 sets
    3rd show (after hours) from 1:00 am to 3:30 am.
    SAT – SUN:
    DOORS AT 4:00 PM. 4 shows.
    1st show Afternoon Jam Session from 4 to 7PM (musicians are free)
    2nd show from 7:30 to 10:00 pm, 2 sets
    3rd show from 10:30 to 1:00 am, 2 sets
    4th show (after hours) from 1:00 am to 3:30 am.
    All ages are welcome. You must have proper ID to purchase alcoholic beverages.
    We do not serve food (unless you consider pretzels to be food).

    Smalls & Mezzrow Office Phone (646) 476-4346.

  24. bullwhip johnson

    It's hard to say anything about race right now. Tensions are running high in every sector. Oh well. It's more important to listen to what people are saying than who they're talking about. That's just a trick. A distraction. Just heard a guy say fuck you or did I say have a nice day? People only hear what they want to hear. That's my point.
    I'm really glad you didn't quit over this thing.

Leave a reply