Jazz Guitar Licks: How to Play The Bebop Lick – the one jazz line everyone should know!

29 Comments

  1. Jazz Guitar Lessons

    Oh yes! BUT you will have to change some notes within the scale to fit C minor. Here's the straight "shortcut": Think of Cm as Cm7-F7 (a ii-V progression) … then use the bebop lick on the F7 scale: F G A Bb C D Eb F … so the lick from the video goes: F E Eb G … D.

  2. Digiu2

    Can I use this over a C minor scale with a Bossa Nova backing track? For some reason I loved this lick.

  3. Henrique de Paula

    Thanks a lot, awesome great lesson, have taken all the points that I need to understand it, made it so easy!

  4. aikido15m

    this is the kind of music i have been looking for. amazing, but very hard to play

  5. dayum73

    @jazzguitarlessonsnet Aha theres even a facebook page for the lick!? Oh man that's crazy!

  6. Jazz Guitar Lessons

    @williamr5101 Fortunately (or unfortunately), this lick is used basically everwhere. Where I'm playing it in the video is on good old G7. It works well on Dm7-G7 (the II-V cadence) also, but sorta works in … well, basically most progressions. You may have to change the mode/scale or the rhythms, but it fits. There's even a Facebook page for this lick, people found it in so many jazz solos that they started a catalog of its appearances!

  7. Ken Koenig

    Hey Bro…Very helpful to my playing! Another tool for my "bag of tricks"
    Thanks for sharing! ; )

  8. Lilian Istrati

    very stupid any time introduction : Hello my name is…………….. ,video lick its good ! Thanks

  9. Jazz Guitar Lessons

    @a0308717 some more :

    it's even more interesting with the "major bebop scale" : C D E F G G# A B C

    Cmaj —> Downstrokes : C – E – G – A

    Upstrokes : B – D – F – Ab

    (so you get a C6 and a B diminished 7th!)

    You can do that with most chord types, try it!

  10. Jazz Guitar Lessons

    @a0308717

    Oh yes! That's a good point. Since the bebop scales should now "fit" the bar length (8 notes for each bar of 4/4) I find that having a strict alternating picking helps.

    You'll soon find out that each downstroke is a chord tone and each upstroke is an extension of some sort.

    I like to see it like this :

    C7 —> Downstrokes : C – E – G – Bb —> Upstrokes : B – D – F – A
    (so a C7 chord and a Bm7(b5) chord)

    Thanks for the nice comments!

    Marc-A

  11. Jazz Guitar Lessons

    @theduke45 No. I was just improvising … I'm sure you could learn the whole thing (or parts of it that you like) by ear. Try it out and let me know.
    (-;

  12. coolwhales

    Great lesson! What would be the practical application of this in a Jazz improv? IE where could I use this in a I-IV-V progression in the key of A?

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